Author: lauriewilson

Tuerong – the Heartbreak Property

Local historian Peter Ward (seen here) has researched and produced an outstanding account of the history of the Tuerong property which might, had circumstances been very different, have been ‘ours’ to enjoy today. Peter’s work may be seen via this link to his Dropbox site – scroll to the bottom of the link page to open and read the Tuerong story. Peter’s own families, the Nutchey and Wards had tenure on the property and he lived on adjoining land in his youth. An outline of our earlier and subsequently revised understanding of the 640 Tuerong Pre-emptive Right (TPR)  and our Wilson...

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Flo Bubb’s Travelling Trunk

For many years when the late Florence Bubb (nee Wilson) was living in the Mornington area she was very active in local affairs; she also had a keen interest in both the history of Snapper Point (Mornington) area, and in that of her Wilson family. Her father was Charles Bowman Wilson a noted Mornington resident and journalist who was also active in civic affairs having served for many years on the Mornington Council including terms as President of the Shire. Flo’s grandmother was Ellen Wilson daughter of John Bowman Wilson. Many years back Flo, was bequeathed a trunk filled with family memorabilia – many photographs of the old Wilson family and connections, newspaper clippings, postcards, letters from family members, and so on. The trunk was passed on to Flo by her aunt Amy McDonald Wilson, another lifelong Mornington resident and sister of C B Wilson. Images of Flo and Amy are shown here. Like Flo, Amy seems to have been an active collector and recorder of matters of family history during her lifetime. Flo also added many items of her own family’s memorabilia. Later she relocated with daughters Dianne and Robyn to Queensland, living in and out from Brisbane. After Flo’s passing the trunk of treasured memorabilia was retained by Robyn – but its existence was well known to many members of the broader Wilson family, and particularly to...

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A Wedding in the Clan in the Tartan of the Clan

Many people ask about our Wilson origins in the ancient history of Scotland and whether we have a tartan of our own – is there a Wilson Clan per se, and is there a Wilson Heraldic Crest or Shield. In fact, the Wilsons were never a Clan in their own right rather they are a Sept of the ancient Gunn Clan and this Clan has its own ancient tartan which is that on the right above. But there is also, what is believed to be the first tartan (the Ancient Wilson tartan) created about 1780 for the Wilson Sept, shown...

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Captain William MacDonald – Mariner/Adventurer

The Seafaring MacDonalds: The MacDonald name has been used as a middle name down the John Bowman Wilson line of the family for several generations. It comes from John Bowman Wilson’s father in law, William MacDonald, probable step-father of Agnes Eliza McDonald to whom John Bowman was married in Hobart in 1851. William McDonald, was a seafarer (as was his father) for over 35 years between 1800 and 1840, indeed Captain and/or Master of several vessels operating both in and around European and southern Atlantic waters, and later in Australia sailing between Hobart and Adelaide, Hobart and Two Fold...

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Captain McDonald – Ships and Adventures

The Terceira Blockade: Captain McDonald was certainly an adventurer in his exploits at sea. His death notice makes reference to his having participated in the blockade of Terceira (Azores) involving British forces during the so called ‘Liberal Wars’ of the Portugese Civil War of 1828 to 1836. Captain McDonald’s Obituary The obituary reference appears to be the only record of his involvement, that exploit having apparently been lost in the lore of our Wilson family. A little research has dug out the pertinent facts of this conflict and the part the British played in it, and by implication the presence of Captain McDonald and we may reasonably conclude his merchant schooner ‘Good Intent’. Perhaps, as history shows was often the case in these sorts of circumstances, William made excellent profits on this dangerous venture – sufficient maybe (as we assumed – incorrectly for that date, but not for a later date) to grade up from his much smaller schooner of 92 tons, to the full size barque sailing ship Britomart of 242 tons, immediately prior to sailing to Australia in 1834. By way of background this record from Wikipedia tells us what the conflict was about. The link following is an excerpt from a historical source document ‘Tales of the Wars’. We have highlighted certain of its contents to illustrate the British involvement – they were not belligerents, rather they...

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